[…] Over the last five years, the country has increasingly drifted towards the destiny of a failed state, putting the bases to become a black hole in the map of North African States –to the extent that some started looking back to the rais’ ferocious dictatorship with some regret. […] In such a chaos, in the attempt to support an actual state-building process in Libya, for Europe and the whole international working group it will be necessary to contain the external and internal separatists pushes, support the creation of measures that will improve the country’s economy, curbing unemployment (especially among the youth), and create a shared system of legality. It is a complex challenge, but it could be our very last chance to save a country of crucial importance for the destiny of North Africa and the Near East as well as the North Shore and, more directly, for Italy’s national interest. […] This is the hope but also the admonishment from which this work originates, together with the wish that the path to peace and stability will soon be taken by the Libyan people, but also, with some ambition, by the whole regional area. […]

Prof. Michela Mercuri

Advisory Board, Mediterranean Affairs
Lecturer in Contemporary History of the Mediterranean Countries, University of Macerata

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DETAILS:

  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: Mediterranean Affairs – CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1539349578
  • ISBN-13: 978-1539349570 
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 0.3 x 23.4 cm

CONTENTS:

Introduction (p. 4)
The International Role of Libya’s Strategic Vacuum (p. 9)
Haftar (p.14)
Daesh (p. 15)
Sea of Migration (p. 16)
Africa (p. 18)
The West (p. 20)
Oil or not Oil (p. 22)
What Kind of Terrorism? Libya Between Ansar al-Sharia and Daesh and Their Enemies (p. 24)
Genesis of the Libyan jihadist threat (p. 27)
The Militant Islamism Under the Gaddafi’s Regime (p. 30)
A Never-Ending Story: Ansar al-Sharia Libya (p. 37)
Daesh Institutionalization in Libya and Its Enemies (p. 45)
Conclusion. Daesh in Libya: Old or New Jihadism? (p. 48)
The Libyan Energy Infrastructures: Geographical Comparison of Oil Wells and Geopolitical Interests (p. 50)
Conclusions. Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and Daesh to the Conquest of a New Emirate (p. 67)
References (p. 74)
About the Authors (p. 78)